Therapeutic Music Offerings

Harp at Sunset

As a Therapeutic Musician, I play music that is intended to have a beneficial effect on body, mind and spirit. I offer Therapeutic Music with harp, voice, flute and other instruments, both for individuals and for groups. 

FORMS OF THERAPEUTIC MUSIC 

MUSIC FOR INDIVIDUALS

Many Therapeutic Musicians play for individuals in hospitals, care homes, hospices and other clinical settings. Others work in their own studios, or visit clients in their own homes. I offer Therapeutic Music in person at my studio and online.

BACKGROUND MUSIC FOR GROUPS

Improvised music on the harp creates a peaceful and meditative ambiance for healing sessions, meditation groups and yoga classes. In these settings, the music is soft and quiet, lovingly supporting and deepening the purpose of the group without drawing attention to itself.

MUSIC FOR HEALING CENTRES

About once a month, I play the harp to accompany the healing sessions at Aylesbury Healing Centre. Please contact me or Robert at Aylesbury Healing Centre for details of the next date that I’m due to be there.

MUSIC FOR YOGA CLASSES AND MEDITATION GROUPS

I regularly work with ZenYo and Yoga By Candlelight, playing improvised music to support and enhance yoga, qigong and meditation classes and workshops.

BACKGROUND MUSIC FOR ESTABLISHMENTS

Gentle background music can provide solace and comfort to visitors and staff. Any environment that can trigger stress, confusion or anxiety can benefit from the distracting and calming influence of Therapeutic Music played on the harp. This includes hospitals, hospices, clinics, surgeries, diagnostic centres, drop-in and advice centres, shelters, support groups, police stations, prisons, law courts, etc.

MUSICAL OFFERINGS FOR PRISONS

I was asked to create a performance for vulnerable prisoners at HMS Prison Bullingdon. Could it include guided meditations to help the men feel safe, a light-hearted singalong and some unusual musical instruments? No problem! The result was a Magical Mystery Tour in which we followed John Lennon to the four corner of the world to see if he could find inner peace – with a little help from his friends, of course..

MUSICAL OFFERINGS FOR CARE HOMES

Well-known tunes and a gentle sing-along can create a cheering and reassuring atmosphere in care homes. These sessions can be especially beneficial for dementia patients, who respond well to old familiar melodies which connect and anchor them to memories from their past.

I regularly perform concerts at various care homes in the Buckinghamshire and surrounding areas. I have also played soothing background music for groups such as the Herts PCA Dementia Support Group.

TAILORED MUSICAL OFFERINGS

Depending on the needs of the group, sessions can also include other elements such as poetry, storytelling, movement and guided meditation.

If you would be interested in Therapeutic Music for yourself or for a group or establishment that you represent, please contact me to discuss how I might help you.

For more information see my blog post on What is Therapeutic Music?

Modal Improvisation in Therapeutic Music Part 2

See Modal Improvisation in Therapeutic Music Part 1

Here I have recorded a short improvisation on the harp in each of the Seven Healing Modes to give you a brief introduction to how they sound. I have chosen not to list examples of the feelings, modes and emotions commonly associated with each mode. This is because I would like you to have the space for your own, uninfluenced, responses to them. This is, after all, how a recipient of Therapeutic Music would experience them.

The following improvisations are thematically linked, with several figures appearing throughout the sequence. I did this so that you would get to experience the extent to which each mode changes the character of a musical phrase. On the other hand, it would also be true to say that the mood that each mode evokes in me influenced how and what I played.

Aeolian mode

Dorian mode

phrygian mode

mixolydian mode

lydian mode

Ionian mode

locrian mode

Modal Improvisation in Therapeutic Music Part 1

Unfamilar music

In Therapeutic Music – that is, music intended to effect positive change – the most beneficial music for the recipient is often unfamiliar to them. There are several reasons for this: unfamiliar music presents a “clean sheet” so the recipient can go on their own inner journey in response, free from previously held associations with a piece of music. In addition, the musician avoids unwittingly choosing music that holds negative associations for the client, which could easily negate any potential therapeutic benefits of the music. 

In addition, an important aspect of Therapeutic Music is that the musician takes their cue from the recipient as to what to play. The musician intuits the needs of the recipient at the start of the session and begins with music that they believe best answers these needs. They then watch for signs as to how the music is being received – changes in breath rate, facial expression, bodily tension, signs of agitation or relaxation, for example – and will alter the music accordingly. This could mean making changes to the tempo, volume, texture, rhythm, pitch, harmony or other variables. There is much more scope to make these changes to unfamiliar music in a musically satisfying manner than there would be for a familiar piece of music.

The unfamiliar music can be anything the client does not know: obscure Medieval, folk or classical melodies are all used. But the ultimate freedom to respond to the recipient is to be found in improvised music. I would estimate that 70-80% of the music I play in a therapeutic setting is completely improvised. It is possible to use any mode, but therapeutic musicians, myself included, have found that the Ancient Greek modes provide a really effective framework. So much so that these modes have begun to be referred to as the Seven Healing Modes. Each of the modes has its own emotional signature and, generally, at least one will stand out as the right mode for the recipient at any given time. Mostly, I take the recipient on a journey through several modes, transforming the emotional landscape as we go.

The Seven Healing modes

The modes under consideration here originated in ancient Greece, each mode being rooted on a different string of the diatonically tuned Greek lyre. To ancient Greek ears, each mode suggested the characteristics or group temperament of a certain tribe – Phrygians, Lydians, Dorians, for example – and this is how each mode got its name. 

These modes passed into the Medieval European church, but due to a scribal error, their names were assigned to a different mode than had been used by the Greeks. It is the Medieval naming system that is use today. The modes themselves, remain the same.

The modes and their root pitch are:

C Ionian
D Dorian
E Phrygian
F Lydian
G Mixolydian
A Aeolian
B Locrian

For Videos of the Modes Go to Modal Improvisation in Therapeutic Music Part 2

Vibroacoustic Harp Therapy

People coming for therapeutic harp sessions in my studio are invited to make use of The Ombed.  This is a vibroacoustic bed in which the frequencies from the harp are directly transferred to the body via inbuilt speakers. The sound of the harp is thus felt bodily at the same time as it is heard. These subtle sensations vibrate and resonate with the tissues of the body, providing the receiver with a “musical massage.”

As the sound of the harp continues to envelop you, hearing and physical sensation merge together in a way that can leave you feeling completely cocooned by the music. In this state, many people find themselves able to drift away, free from everyday worries and concerns. According to the founder of Vibroacoustic Harp Therapy, “Most patients who receive VAHT report responses such as deep relaxation, dream-like imagery, pain and tension reduction, increased energy and body awareness, as well as the feeling of being nurtured.”1

Please note that due to Covid-19 restrictions, I am currently unable to offer in person Vibroacoustic Harp Therapy sessions. I shall resume treatments as soon as it possible to do so.

¹Williams, Sarajane Good Vibrations: Principles of Vibroacoustic Harp Therapy, 2005, page 74